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20130207
20130207
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)
.r., the language does not bind us to five-day and that's where we are. >> ron. lisa? >> angela. >> angela, sorry. >> you said 45 million work hours, what does that equate in terms of the number of jobs and is this layoffs or do it through attrition? >> it equates to 22,500 jobs. right now, the postal service, we run in excess of 10% overtime, almost 12% and we have not hired and using attrition to take advantage of people leaving without having to resort to layoffs. by eliminating overtime and looking at some flexibility we have with the part-time work force and potentially working with the unions on some this will help. since the year 2000, the postal service has reduced approximately 306,000 jobs, people, new layoffs. we do not want to lay off. we are a responsible employer. yes, sir? >> just to follow up on her question, nuts and bolts, 22,500 jobs, how many people get laid off or bought out when? and the second question is in the back of your folder here, you have daily revenue and daily out-go and the revenue exceeds the out-go. so -- >> the revenue doesn't exceed the out-go. $15.9 billion
of that group, arizona senator jeff flake, said rubio is the key to getting the job done. angela mcglowan is fox news political analyst, very well plugged in on capitol hill and knows a thing or two about this issue. is jeff flake right? is marco rubio the lynchpin? >> jeff flake is right but jeff flake is also a key player in this. he is conservative member of congress just elected to the senate when jon kyl retired in arizona. jeff flake has an interesting story that he grew up around mexican migrant workers so he understands that plight. however marco rubio is a member of the hispanic conference which is republican hispanic members of congress but also the hispanic caucus. these are more liberal members of congress. the one thing they can agree on is immigration reform the but, jon, a house divided can not stand and the senate has been a little bit different from the house as we've seen. so these two members can bring both houses together. jon: there are a number of very conservative members of the house who don't like the fact that people who came to this country illegally, walked across the
today, i think if you've been listening to angela merkel to david cameron himself and francois hollande this week, the indication is that perhaps we shouldn't be as optimistic as jean-claude juncker would have us believe, but someone has to fly the flag for europe and we like our posturing in europe. overall, what rewe looking at? germany, the uk, the nordic european countries are fighting for cuts, real term cuts in this whereas italy and france would rather have it held steady. even within that, the battle lines aren't clear. the uk and sweden in particular, trying to protect their all important rebates. we've got italy saying that their contribution overall is too great and, of course, as i just mentioned, france very concerned about the agricultural spending that contributes around 40% of the entire eu budget. so as usual, we get a of comments and a lot of the european leaders come to this working out, just how they can negotiate and is walk away, flying their individual flag and saying, hey, i came out with what i asked. but, you know, ultimately, what we've seen in the past is tha
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)